Monthly Archives: September 2012

Uncertain Futures

Vanessa Bell, ‘Abstract Painting’, c.1914

‘In a large part, the uncertain future facing us early in the twenty-first century arose from the inventions, thoughts and transformations of those unusually rich fifteen years between 1900 and 1914, a period of extraordinary creativity in the arts and sciences, of enormous change in society and in the very image people had of themselves. Everything that was to become important during the twentieth century – from quantum physics to women’s emancipation, from abstract art to space travel, from communism and fascism to the consumer society, from in industrialized slaughter to the power of the media – had already made deep impressions in the years before 1914, so that the rest of the century was little more than an exercise, wonderful and hideous by turn, in living out and exploring these new possibilities’

(Philipp Blom, The Vertigo Years: Change and Culture in the West, 1900-1914, London 2008)

Advertisements

Victorian Humanity and its Others

The following CFP may be of interest to Edwardian scholars:

“Victorian Humanity and its Others: An International Conference” CFP (VSAWC 2013)

The Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada invites proposals for a conference on Victorian Humanity and its Others. The conference, hosted by the University of the Fraser Valley and Douglas College, will take place 27-28 April 2013 at the Coast Hotel, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, located right near English Bay and the beautiful Stanley Park seawall walk.

We seek proposals for papers that examine the theme of humanity and its others in Victorian culture and society. We warmly welcome papers from the perspectives of history and art history, literary studies, gender studies, race and ethnicity studies, animal studies, and science. Papers will address Victorian definitions, expressions, and contestations of humanity and its others, as well as the way these definitions and debates were shaped by new developments in natural science, anthropology, religion, technology, and industry. Continue reading