Category Archives: Resources

Ten Edwardian Paintings from Charles Rutherston’s Collection

charlesr

Charles Lambert Rutherston (1866-1927) was the older brother of the artists William Rothenstein (1872-1945) and Albert Rutherston (1881-1953). After training at Bradford’s Technical College and showing some talent as an artist, Charles followed his father into the textile industry. A successful businessman, he remained a keen supporter of the arts and collected widely, from Chinese bronzes to contemporary prints. Rutherston played a key role in the careers of many young artists – including Gwen and Augustus John, Paul Nash, Wyndham Lewis and Henry Moore  – as well as being the leading patron of his brother William. Wyndham Lewis noted that Rutherston was one of the few men he allowed into his studio: ‘For him I left the gate ajar. This was not only because one naturally likes people who came “collecting” the works of one’s hands, but because he was one of the pleasantest and least affected people of my acquaintance’. Continue reading

Ten Edwardian Paintings from the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

BMAGG_location_image_1

The Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, rather like Bradford’s Cartwright Hall Gallery, is very much a product of the Edwardian Era. Designed by Frederick Wills and funded by the tobacco magnate Sir William Wills, building started in 1901 and was completed in 1906. The gallery’s Edwardian origins are currently brought to the fore by the display of two major paintings in the foyer: Ernest Board’s historical re-enactment of Italian explorer John Cabot’s departure from Bristol in the fifteenth century (painted in 1906), and Roderick MacKenzie’s monumental depiction of the 1903 Delhi Durbar. A selection of Victorian and Edwardian paintings (including Talmage’s Mackerel Shawl) are currently on display elsewhere in the gallery. Continue reading

Ten Edwardian Paintings from the Cartwright Hall Art Gallery

cartwrighthall1904

The Cartwight Hall in 1904

The Cartwight Hall Art Gallery in Bradford is one of the great Edwardian art galleries. It was designed by Simpson & Allen (whose other works included the Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow, 1901) and named in honour of the inventor Edmund Cartwright, inventor of the power loom and the combing machine, both of which had played a huge part in Bradford’s prosperous textile industry. The building was funded largely by Samuel Lister, a local industrialist, and opened in 1904, during Bradford’s exhibition of Art and Industry. The opening exhibition was a survey of British art which culminated in the work of local artists such as William Rothenstein, William Shackleton and Ernest Sichel. Continue reading

Ten Edwardian Paintings from the Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum

The Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum

The Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum

As we at the ECN are frequently keen to point out, the Public Catalogue Foundation and BBC Your Paintings have done an amazing job at bringing Edwardian paintings back into the public consciousness. Over the course of this year we intend to put the spotlight on specific collections, and to select a group of ten Edwardian (or near-Edwardian) paintings from that collection.

We start with one of the many galleries that opened during the Edwardian Era. The Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum in Bournemouth was founded by Sir Merton (1835–1921) and Lady (1835–1920) Russell-Cotes on Bournemouth’s East Cliff. Commissioned in 1897, the building was completed in 1901 and officially opened in 1907. Continue reading

Resource: BRANCH – Britain, Representation, and Nineteenth-Century History

branch_logo_brown

Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following web-based resource, edited by Dino Franco Felluga:

BRANCH, which is intertwined with Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net, provides users with a free, expansive, searchable, reliable, peer-reviewed, copy-edited, easy-to-use overview of the period 1775-1925.  Unlike dry chronologies that simply list dates with minimal information about the many noteworthy events of a given year, BRANCH offers a compilation of a myriad of short articles on not only high politics and military history but also “low” or quotidian histories (architecture design, commercial history, marginal figures of note, and so on).  Since no one scholar could hope to provide a complete overview of an entire century of British society, BRANCH compiles material from a host of scholars working on all facets of the British nineteenth century.  Authors come from History, Art History, and English departments across the world. The site differs from wikipedia in so far as all articles have undergone peer review, copy-editing, and proofing.  Each article also seeks to interpret the events being discussed.  Indeed, many events are discussed by more than one scholar.

Thanks to its site structure, BRANCH offers users an innovative approach to history itself, suggesting that any given bit of historical information can branch outward in often surprising directions. Rather than provide a linear timeline of history from the perspective of the victors, BRANCH wishes provide a history that comes closer to what Walter Benjamin famously termed jetztzeit or “the time of the now,” an impacted history that explores the messy uncertainties and possibilities of any given historical moment.

See more here.

Ten Restful Ladies (1900-1904)

Ambrose McEvoy, 'The Letter', c.1904

Ambrose McEvoy, ‘The Letter’, c.1904

‘For the past few years the New English Art Club has been dominated by the personalities of a few members who have made the domestic picture the dominant note of the club’s exhibitions. I do not mean the millinery-baby domestic picture of the Royal Academy, rather the home picture of the Dutch School. The explanation is simple enough. Mr. Orpen, Mr. Rothenstein, Mr. Russell, Mr. Muirhead have chosen to paint the rooms in which they live, and the choice and simple possessions that an artist gathers about him. This example of dogged hard work has been infectious’ (C L H, The Academy and Literature, Nov 15th, 1902)

In light of this review, and this short article, here is a selection of ten early Edwardian representations of the domestic interior (or, as Max Beerbohm once put it, ‘restful ladies in dim or sunny rooms’). All artists featured were regular exhibitors at the New England Art Club at the turn of the century.

Please feel free to put forward your own suggestions/favourites in the comments!

1. William Rothenstein, The Browning Readers, 1900

2. William Orpen, The Mirror, 1900

3. Henry Tonks, Rosamund and the Purple Jar, 1900

4. Philip Wilson Steer, Hydrangeas, 1901

5. Mary MacEvoy, Interior: Girl Reading, 1902

6. Francis Dodd, Afternoon in the Parlour, 1902

7. Ambrose McEvoy, The Letter, 1904

8. David Muirhead, Night Shadows, c.1900

9. Walter Sickert, La Nera, 1903

10. Harold Gilman, Grace Canedy, c.1904

 

British Art Network Recordings

Image

C. R. W. Nevinson, ‘Banking at 4000 Feet’, 1917

Recordings of recent British Art Network seminars are now available on the Tate website (scroll down for older events). These include April’s discussion of Art and the First World War and the January discussion on ‘Overlooked Victorian artists’. Highly recommended!

Empire Online

Described as a ‘powerful and interactive collection of primary source documents, sourced from leading archives around the world’, Empire Online is certainly one of the leading online resources for anyone studying the British Empire from 1492 to the present day. Though the site covers a vast period, there are a host of documents relating to the Edwardian era, including images of the Boer War, articles on immigration, an Indian woman’s impressions of England in 1900, issues of ‘Girl’s Empire’, and Tales of Adventures from the Heart of Australia. The website also contains essays by leading scholars, an interactive map, and a detailed chronology. Well worth investigating!

CFP: The Journal of the Friends of Arthur Machen

machenbanner

The Friends of Arthur Machen are inviting submissions to their journal Faunus.

This hard-bound journal has appeared twice yearly since the inauguration of the Friends in the 1990s. It is a platform for discussion of Machen’s life and work, as well as original archival research and/or articles and pieces not easily available in any other form. It is not peer reviewed and has a tradition of accessible though rigorous scholarship. Articles of between 2,500 and 5,000 words are encouraged, although those falling outside of these parameters will certainly be considered. Contributors will receive copies of the relevant issue, which is also distributed to members of the Friends. For membership information, please see: http://www.arthurmachen.org.uk

For a list of contents to date, please see: http://www.philsp.com/homeville/fmi/b75.htm#A1278

Please contact James Machin at jmachi01@mail.bbk.ac.uk if you are interested in submitting or have any questions.

Review: Modernist Magazines in Britain and Ireland, 1880-1955

Image

The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Volume One: Britain and Ireland 1880-1955, edited by Peter Brooker and Andrew Thacker, Oxford University Press, 2013. £35.

The process of studying modernist magazines – or ‘little magazines’ as they are sometimes known – has changed significantly over the past ten or fifteen years. One no longer has to track such publications down in the dusty vaults of university libraries or public archives, or purchase expensive facsimiles. Most modernist magazines are now freely available online, either at the Modernist Journals Project, a co-venture between Brown University and the University of Tulsa, or at the more recent (and similarly titled) Modernist Magazines Project, based at the Universities of Sussex and De Montfort, and funded by the AHRC.

Such online resources are clearly invaluable, ensuring the future of exciting research in this field. Indeed, both of these websites continue to expand at a rapid pace, with new magazines, essays and interactive timelines and, most intriguingly, digital visualizations appearing every month or so.  Despite this wealth of online activity, important book-length studies continue to appear, the most recent of which is the paperback edition of the first volume of The Oxford Critical History of Modernist Magazines, first published in 2009, and edited by Peter Brooker and Andrew Thacker, co-founders of the Modernist Magazines Project. Continue reading