Tag Archives: conference

Two Week Extension: Englishness and The Edwardian Landscape

 

The Blue Pool, 1911 (oil on panel), John, Augustus Edwin (1878-1961) © The estate of Augustus John. Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museum, Scotland / Bridgeman Images.

The Blue Pool, 1911 (oil on panel), John, Augustus Edwin (1878-1961) © The estate of Augustus John. Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museum, Scotland / Bridgeman Images.

The Edwardian Culture Network is able to offer postgraduate and early-career researcher bursaries to speakers wishing to take part in the upcoming symposium ‘Englishness and the Edwardian Landscape’. New deadline: February 8th. N.B. This call for papers is open to those currently working on a postgraduate qualification, or to those who finished their PhD after 2012:

CFP: ‘To show a foreigner England’: Englishness and the Edwardian Landscape

Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, April 11th 2016.

This one-day symposium – coinciding with the exhibition Inquisitive Eyes: Slade Painters in Edwardian Wessex – takes as its starting point the following quotation from E.M. Forster’s novel Howard’s End (1910):

If one wanted to show a foreigner England, perhaps the wisest course would be to take him to the final section of the Purbeck Hills, and stand him on their summit, a few miles to the east of Corfe. Then system after system of our island would roll together under his feet.

Forster’s comment suggests that the rolling hills of the South West should be taken as a synecdoche for England. Taking our cues from this idea – but expanding the discussion to include other regions also – we will address a range of important questions: where was Englishness located at the turn of the century, and why? What made a landscape especially English, or distinctly not-English? What role did artist’s colonies play in understanding and promoting particular landscapes in the national consciousness? How important was landscape to the development of modern art in England? How was the English landscape marketed to audiences outside England, especially the wider Empire? Finally, how did depictions of the landscape by writers such as Thomas Hardy affect visual artists?

Although many of the questions raised by the exhibition are art-historical in nature, we welcome speakers and participants from other disciplines, including literature, cultural geography and history. We have already identified and contacted a small group of established academics, who have agreed to take part in our discussions. These include figures who have written widely on the subject,  some of whom contributed to the 2002 publication Geographies of Englishness: Landscape and the National Past, the influence of which we wish to acknowledge. In the thirteen years since this publication, however, research into early twentieth-century British art, national identity and Empire has expanded greatly, and new thinkers have entered the field. To this end, three-four graduate/early-career researchers will be selected to speak at the symposium. To be eligible, you must be currently working on an MA or PhD, or have completed a PhD after 2012. Speakers will receive a £100 grant to support travel and accommodation. To apply, please send a 300 word proposal, along with a one-page CV, to edwardianculture@hotmail.co.uk by January 16th.

This event has been generously supported by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and will be hosted by the Royal West of England Academy.

CFP: Recoveries 2014: Reconnections – 1714-1914.

Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following CFP:

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Reconnecting with three centuries of literature and history.
A one day conference at the School of English, University of Nottingham.
23 June 2014.

2014 marks the centenary of the Great War, the bicentenary of Napoleon’s exile to Elba, and the tricentenary of George I’s accession to the throne.

Building on the success of the 2011 conference, Recoveries – Revisiting the Long Nineteenth Century, the University of Nottingham is pleased to announce a second conference in association with Centre for Regional Literature and Culture: Reconnections. This one-day interdisciplinary conference seeks to re-evaluate the scholarly practice/s of recovery projects and to consider how they impact on our understanding of literary, political and cultural developments, changes, fads and fashions over the last three centuries.

We invite proposals from postgraduates and early career researchers in literature, history, politics and any other branch of the humanities. Papers can deal with any period/s, author/s or text/s produced between 1714 and 1914. They could focus on, but are not limited to, the following: Continue reading

Call for Papers: Beyond the Garden Party: Re-thinking Edwardian Culture

Spencer Gore, ‘The Garden Path’, c.1910

CALL FOR PAPERS: Beyond the Garden Party: Re-thinking Edwardian Culture

It must have seemed like a long garden party on a golden afternoon – to those who were inside the garden. But a great deal that was important was going on outside the garden: it was out there that the twentieth-century world was being made. Nostalgia is a pleasing emotion, but it is also a simplifying one; to think of Edwardian England as a peaceful, opulent world before the flood is to misread the age and to misunderstand the changes that were dramatized by the First World War (Samuel Hynes, The Edwardian Turn of Mind).

More than forty years since Samuel Hynes wrote these words, many accounts and representations of Edwardian England still invoke the image of the garden party. Building on recent critical reappraisals, such as The Edwardian Sense (Yale 2010), and coinciding with the major Edwardian exhibition at the Yale Center for British Art, this interdisciplinary conference seeks to examine this notion, and to explore the alternatives. Was there such a thing as a distinct Edwardian culture; if so, what were the forces behind it?

We invite papers on any aspect of British culture between the years 1895-1914 (the ‘long Edwardian’ era). Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Edwardian Media: art, communication technologies, design, fashion, fiction, film, music, poetry, religion, theatre, and other forms of ‘high’ and ‘popular’ culture.
• Categorising the Edwardians: Victorianism/Edwardianism/Modernism/pre- and post-War/fin de siècle/the turn of the century. How useful is the term ‘Edwardian’?
• Revisionary Edwardians: challenging conventional notions of Edwardian writers, artists, and thinkers; fresh perspectives on famous Edwardians, and critical recoveries of neglected figures.
• Eclectic Edwardians: the catholicity of Edwardian taste and cultural products, the genre-hopping of Edwardian writers and artists, and Edwardian interdisciplinarity.
• Edwardian Afterlives: Edwardian nostalgia, Edwardian cultural afterlives, twenty-first-century visions of the Edwardians.
• The past and future of Edwardian studies; teaching the Edwardians.

‘Beyond the Garden Party: Re-thinking Edwardian Culture’ is the inaugural conference of the Edwardian Culture Network. The two-day conference will be joint-hosted by the Universities of York and Durham on 12th-13th April 2013. Speakers will be asked to state in which city they would prefer to give their paper.

Please send 300 word abstracts to edwardianculture@hotmail.co.uk by no later than Monday 3rd December 2012.

Call for Postgraduate Papers: Contemporary Aesthetic Education in the UK

University of York 10th December 2012

The purpose of this inter-disciplinary workshop is to explore the role of aesthetic education in the UK today. The presence of the concept of aesthetic education in the thinking of British cultural critics can be traced to the profound influence of Matthew Arnold, who inherits the notion from its German Enlightenment proponents – Schiller, Herder, and Winckelmann. The tradition holds that instruction in art and literature can bring about real changes in society. In the UK today, however, education in literature and the arts is being increasingly threatened by social change rather than facilitating those changes. In Culture and Anarchy, Arnold prescribed culture as the antidote to a looming threat of ‘anarchy’ which lay chiefly, he suggested, in vulgar monetary concerns. Continue reading