Tag Archives: edwardian art galleries

Ten Edwardian Paintings from the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

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The Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, rather like Bradford’s Cartwright Hall Gallery, is very much a product of the Edwardian Era. Designed by Frederick Wills and funded by the tobacco magnate Sir William Wills, building started in 1901 and was completed in 1906. The gallery’s Edwardian origins are currently brought to the fore by the display of two major paintings in the foyer: Ernest Board’s historical re-enactment of Italian explorer John Cabot’s departure from Bristol in the fifteenth century (painted in 1906), and Roderick MacKenzie’s monumental depiction of the 1903 Delhi Durbar. A selection of Victorian and Edwardian paintings (including Talmage’s Mackerel Shawl) are currently on display elsewhere in the gallery. Continue reading

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Ten Edwardian Paintings from the Cartwright Hall Art Gallery

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The Cartwight Hall in 1904

The Cartwight Hall Art Gallery in Bradford is one of the great Edwardian art galleries. It was designed by Simpson & Allen (whose other works included the Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow, 1901) and named in honour of the inventor Edmund Cartwright, inventor of the power loom and the combing machine, both of which had played a huge part in Bradford’s prosperous textile industry. The building was funded largely by Samuel Lister, a local industrialist, and opened in 1904, during Bradford’s exhibition of Art and Industry. The opening exhibition was a survey of British art which culminated in the work of local artists such as William Rothenstein, William Shackleton and Ernest Sichel. Continue reading