Tag Archives: Edwardian ghost stories

CFP: M.R. James and the Modern Ghost Story

MR James

M. R. James and the Modern Ghost Story: a one-day conference hosted by the University of Leeds, to be held at The Leeds Library on 28 March 2015

Confirmed Keynotes: Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck College, University of London);  Darryl Jones (Trinity College, Dublin); Helen Grant (Author)

The conference will be followed by a public screening of ‘A Warning to the Curious’ (1972) and a Q & A session with writer/director, Lawrence Gordon Clark

The ghost stories of Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936) are amongst the most influential in the English language. Never out of print, they have been adapted numerous times for stage, screen and other media and their formal and thematic features have come to embody the very model of the traditional English ghost story.

This one-day symposium is the first such event dedicated entirely to M.R. James’s ghost stories. The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers with an interest in James’s fiction in order to assess the significance of his ghost stories from a range of theoretical, literary and historical perspectives.

Although widely read and tremendously influential, James’s fiction has received little academic attention. The aim of this event is to foster further discussion and analysis of these tales and their place in late-Victorian and Edwardian literature and culture. Continue reading

CFP Reminder: Enchanted Edwardians

thewindinthewillows

Our third annual conference will be held at the University of Bristol next March. Please see details below, and share with interested parties! (pdf version: Enchanted Edwardians CFP)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: ENCHANTED EDWARDIANS

Third Annual Conference of the Edwardian Culture Network,

University of Bristol, 30TH-31ST MARCH 2015

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Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Professor Ronald Hutton (University of Bristol) and Dr. Sarah Turner (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art)

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‘The Hills are empty now, and all the People of the Hills are gone. I’m the only one left. I’m Puck, the oldest Old Thing in England, very much at your service if—if you care to have anything to do with me’.

Rudyard Kipling, Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906)

Edwardian culture is filled with otherworldly encounters: from Rat and Mole’s meeting with Pan on the riverbank in Wind in the Willows (1908), to Lionel Wallace’s glimpse of an enchanted garden beyond the green door in H. G. Well’s short story The Door in the Wall (1911). In art, Charles Conder’s painted fans evoked an exotic arcadia, whilst the music of Edward Elgar and Frederick Delius conjured up nostalgic dreamlands. Continue reading