Tag Archives: gardening

Edwardian (Horti)culture 8: The Rebellious Gardener

'The Gardener's Daughter' by Charles Conder, 1902-3 (Manchester City Galleries)

‘The Gardener’s Daughter’ by Charles Conder, 1902-3 (Manchester City Galleries)

‘How I loathe being ill! How I fight it, rebel against it, garden up to the very last moment and get up tottering to go out and replant the violet bed’ (Mrs Leslie Williams, A Garden in the Suburbs, 1901).

Edwardian (Horti)culture 7: Exercising the Imagination and Assessing the Competition

'Bar House Garden, Beverley' by Frederick William Elwell, 1914 (Beverley Art Gallery)

‘Bar House Garden, Beverley’ by Frederick William Elwell, 1914 (Beverley Art Gallery)

‘Half the interest of a garden is the constant exercise of the imagination. You are always living three, or indeed six, months hence. I believe that people entirely devoid of imagination never can be really good gardeners. To be content with the present, and not striving about the future, is fatal’

‘When looking through old books or modern catalogues, one feels one has nothing in one’s garden, but I must confess that visiting other people’s gardens makes me feel I really have a very fair collection’ (Mrs C. W. Earle, Pot-Pourri From a Surrey Garden, 1897).

Edwardian (Horti)culture 6: Depression and Disappointment

'A View from the Window at 6 Cambrian Road, Richmond' by Spencer Gore (The Fitzwilliam Museum)

‘A View from the Window at 6 Cambrian Road, Richmond’ by Spencer Gore (The Fitzwilliam Museum)

‘You must not, any of you, be surprised if you have moments in your gardening life of such profound depression and disappointment that you will almost wish you had been content to leave everything alone and have no garden at all’ (Mrs C. W. Earle, Pot-Pourri From a Surrey Garden, 1897).

Edwardian (Horti)culture 3: Slinking out with a Spade

'Dorelia McNeill in the Garden at Alderney manor' by Augustus John, 1911 (National Museum, Wales)

‘Dorelia McNeill in the Garden at Alderney manor’ by Augustus John, 1911 (National Museum, Wales)

‘If I could only dig and plant myself! How much easier, besides being so fascinating, to make your own holes exactly where you want them and put in your plants exactly as you choose instead of giving orders that can only be half understood from the moment you depart from the lines laid down by that long piece of string! In the first ecstasy of having a garden all my own, and in my burning impatience to make the waste places blossom like a rose, I did one warm Sunday in last year’s April during the servants’ dinner hour, doubly secure from the gardener by the day and the dinner, slink out with a spade and a rake and feverishly dig a little piece of ground and break it up and sow surreptitious ipomæa and run back very hot and guilty into the house and get into a chair and behind and book and look languid just in time to save my reputation’ (Elizabeth Von Arnim, Elizabeth and Her German Garden, 1898)