Tag Archives: H G Wells

CFP: Elizabeth Von Arnim Conference

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This conference – held on 13th September 2015 – will re-evaluate the writing of Elizabeth von Arnim (1866-1941). Von Arnim’s complex, intelligent and witty novels were critically acclaimed and immensely popular during her lifetime, but until recently they have received little academic attention. This conference aims to shed fresh light on the contemporary contexts of von Arnim’s work and the literary hierarchies and values that have shaped her reputation.

Papers are invited on all aspects of von Arnim’s work and career. Suggested topics include:

  • Contexts: understanding von Arnim’s writing in the context of the fin de siècle, the New Woman, middlebrow, modernism, World War 1 and 2, and women’s writing.
  • Literary relationships with other writers such as E. M. Forster, Hugh Walpole, Katherine Mansfield, H. G. Wells and Frank Swinnerton.
  • Intertexts: tracing the influences of writers such as the Brontes and Jane Austen.
  • Forms: gardening, diary and epistolary novels; music; adaptation for film, theatre.
  • International perspective: the importance of Switzerland, France, Germany and the USA in her writing and career.

Proposals of 400 words for 20-minute papers should be sent to countessrussell@gmail.com. The deadline is 20th February 2015.

Conference organisers: Erica Brown (Sheffield Hallam University), Isobel Maddison (Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University) and Jennifer Walker (Independent Scholar).

The conference will be held at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University, UK. The conference website can be found here.

On Arnold Bennett (5): Greatness beyond Glamour

'Man Reading' by Barnett Freedman (c.1925)

‘Man Reading’ by Barnett Freedman (c.1925)

‘The hero, Clayhanger, is merely a nice young fellow who likes to read and yearns for a more elegance and refinement than his home can offer him. Without great force or energy, he is industrious and honest; without overwhelming abilities, he has a taste for literature and art; without deep tenderness, he has kindly emotions and a fund of fairness and good-will […] There is no glamour of romance thrown about the situation; there are no adventures. No attempt at all is made to rectify reality. But it is a very great novel, none the less; so great that it throws into the shadow all the novels of the last decade. Even [H.G. Well’s] Tono-Bungay, full of meat and life as it was, seems slim and unpleasant in comparison.’ (Unsigned review of Clayhanger, North American Review, December 191o)

For more information on our upc0ming symposium (‘Arnold Bennett and His Circle’), see here (or e-mail us at edwardianculture@hotmail.co.uk for a draft programme of the day’s events)

On Arnold Bennett (4): Go On, Great Man!

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‘My dear Bennett,

You know what life is. I have really wanted badly to write you at length about The Old Wives Tale and make you understand that it isn’t simply just genial mutual flattery and so forth that I want to send you this time […] I think the book a quite pre-eminent novel so that it at least doubles your size in my estimation. It is far too big, too fine and too restrained to get at first anything like the recognition it is bound in the long run to bring you. It is the best book I have seen this year – and there have been one or two very good books – and I am certain it will secure you the respect of all the distinguished critics who are now consuming gripe-water and suchlike, if you never never write another line. It is all at such a high level that one does not know where to begin commending, but I think the high light for me is the bakehouse glimpse of Sam Povey. But the knowledge, the details, the spirit! from first to last it never fails. I wish it could have gone into ‘The English Review’. Well, I go round telling everyone I meet about it – I wish Chapman & Hall would do the same. Go on great man!’

Yours ever. H. G. [Wells] (November 1908)

For more information on our upc0ming symposium (‘Arnold Bennett and His Circle’), see here (or e-mail us at edwardianculture@hotmail.co.uk for a draft programme of the day’s events).

CFP Reminder: Enchanted Edwardians

thewindinthewillows

Our third annual conference will be held at the University of Bristol next March. Please see details below, and share with interested parties! (pdf version: Enchanted Edwardians CFP)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: ENCHANTED EDWARDIANS

Third Annual Conference of the Edwardian Culture Network,

University of Bristol, 30TH-31ST MARCH 2015

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Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Professor Ronald Hutton (University of Bristol) and Dr. Sarah Turner (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art)

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‘The Hills are empty now, and all the People of the Hills are gone. I’m the only one left. I’m Puck, the oldest Old Thing in England, very much at your service if—if you care to have anything to do with me’.

Rudyard Kipling, Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906)

Edwardian culture is filled with otherworldly encounters: from Rat and Mole’s meeting with Pan on the riverbank in Wind in the Willows (1908), to Lionel Wallace’s glimpse of an enchanted garden beyond the green door in H. G. Well’s short story The Door in the Wall (1911). In art, Charles Conder’s painted fans evoked an exotic arcadia, whilst the music of Edward Elgar and Frederick Delius conjured up nostalgic dreamlands. Continue reading

CFP: H.G. Wells and his World on the Eve of the War

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When the Lamps Went Out: H. G. Wells and his World on the Eve of the War: H. G. Wells Society Conference, Durham,

27 September 2014

Plenary speakers:
Professor Matthew Pateman (Sheffield Hallam University)
Megan Shepherd (author of The Madman’s Daughter)

This year will see the anniversary of the outbreak of what H. G. Wells optimistically hoped would be ‘The War that Will End War’. When the Lamps Went Out is a conference that seeks to take a snapshot of the literary, political and social landscape at the end of the ‘long nineteenth century’ and the dawn of the First World War. We welcome papers on Wells’s Edwardian and early twentieth-century work, on his political and discussion novels, and/or on his journalistic, political, utopian and wargaming writing, and on the legacies of the nineteenth century in the early twentieth. We also invite papers on connections with the writers and people of significance from Wells’s circle in this period: such figures may include (but need not be confined to): Elizabeth von Arnim, Arnold Bennett, Edward Carpenter, G. K Chesterton, Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, John Galsworthy, Alfred Harmsworth, Violet Hunt, Vernon Lee, C. F. G Masterman, E. Nesbit, Amber Reeves, Dorothy Richardson, Elizabeth Robins, Robert Ross, Bertrand Russell, George Bernard Shaw, Frederick Soddy, Beatrice and Sidney Webb, Rebecca West… We especially welcome proposals for papers on Wells, gender, sexuality and marriage.

Papers should be no more than 20 minutes long. Please send proposals (maximum of 250 words) by no later than 20th June 2014, or expressions of interest in attending, to s.j.james@durham.ac.uk

When the Lamps Went Out is a collaboration between Durham University Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, the H. G. Wells Society and the Edwardian Culture Network. Attendance fee is: H G Wells Society members: unwaged £20, waged £30; non-Members: unwaged £25, waged £35. The Wells Society can be joined at:http://www.hgwellsusa.50megs.com/.

This conference also marks the launch of the exhibition Books for Boys: Heroism, Empire and Adventure at the Dawn of the First World War. Books for Boys tells the story of Britain and Germany in the years leading up to the Great War through showing what the public enjoyed reading.The exhibition will also display late-Victorian and Edwardian maps, toys, uniforms, photographs, pictures, medals, literary memorabilia and other artefacts and ephemera. Conference delegates will be invited to a private view of the exhibition on the evening preceding the conference.

Edwardian Encounters: Spade House

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Calling a Heart a Spade: Wells and Voysey’s Kentish Utopia

The Wells House Nursing Home stands on a hilltop in Sandgate – a prosperous and attractive seaside village on the borders of Folkestone in Kent – with fine views over the village and the coastline. Wells House – previously Spade House – was built in 1899-1900 to the designs of two men: C.F.A. Voysey, the house’s architect, and Voysey’s client, H.G. Wells.

Wells came to be in Sandgate, and to commission Voysey, as a result of a combination of illness and literary friendship. In 1896 Wells had befriended the ailing novelist George Gissing, and, when Wells’s own chronic kidney condition led to his collapse during a cycling holiday along the south coast in 1898, it was Gissing’s childhood friend, Dr Henry Hick, who became Wells’s personal physician. Continue reading

CFP: Social Fabrics – H.G.Wells & William Morris

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Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following CFP:

Social Fabrics: HG Wells and William Morris Conference

A Conference Jointly Run by the H.G. Wells Society and the William Morris Society; Saturday 14 September 2013, The Coach House, Kelmscott House, London, UK; 10.00am-4.30pm

We are delighted to invite papers on the full range of topics indicated by the title of the conference.Deadline for Paper Proposals: 15 May 2013

Please email abstracts of 500 words to
Emelyne Godfrey, emelynegodfrey@yahoo.com
Helen Elletson, curator@williammorrissociety.org.uk
Patrick Parrinder, j.parrinder064@btinternet.com
and Sylvia Hardy sylviahardy@btinternet.com.

Location of Conference:
Kelmscott House, 26 Upper Mall, Hammersmith, W6 9TA
Nearest tube stations: Ravenscourt Park (10-minute walk) and Hammersmith (15-minute walk).