Tag Archives: modernism

CFP: ‘Movement’ for Exchanges

fly

Still from Percy Smith’s ‘The Acrobatic Fly’ (1910 film)

Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following CFP:

CALL FOR PAPERS: Exchanges: The Warwick Research Journal  

Exchanges: The Warwick Research Journal is the peer-reviewed, open access, interdisciplinary research journal of the Institute of Advanced Study (IAS), University of Warwick. We are inviting high-quality interdisciplinary submissions from researchers at all stages of their careers in all academic fields.

For the October 2017/ Fifth Anniversary edition of the Journal, we particularly welcome submissions which will contribute to a themed section on ‘Movement’. Pertinent to current debates within and across many disciplines, movement can be understood as action, motion, emotion, and mobility, ranging from physical, mental, mechanical, geographical, industrial to musical, artistic, social, cultural, and political. People (migration and displacement), commodities and capital (trade and trade agreements), ideas and information (communication, translation, and connectivity), and images (film and television) move, and they move in all directions. We are also interested in the lack of movement, stasis, stagnation, and standoff, for example.

‘Movement’ is a compelling subject for scholarship in cultural history and the History of Art. Continue reading

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Essay: Bennett Amongst the Modernists

bennett

On October 17th-18th, the Edwardian Culture Network will host a symposium entitled ‘Arnold Bennett and his Circle’ (see our ‘events’ pages for more details). In the following short essay, Dr. Andrew Glazzard, one of the co-organizers, anticipates some of the issues we intend to cover in our discussions.

I’d like to try a thought experiment – a game of matching the novel with the writer. Take two novels, both written in 1922 – ‘the year of Modernism’. One is set in a city, but very little happens. This novel is narrated with ironic detachment, and dwells on the drab lives of ordinary people who fail to understand each other. The other is an adventure story, set on the French coast during the Napoleonic Wars. It is about a pirate, features buried treasure, includes a love story between a dashing soldier and a beautiful woman, and ends with an exciting chase featuring Horatio Nelson.

One of these novels was written by an early modernist – an innovator who remains a fixture on university syllabuses, and has been widely acknowledged for his technical achievements and for bringing a sceptical, disillusioned world-view to British fiction. The other writer became immensely popular in his lifetime, was regarded by his younger contemporaries as an exemplar of everything that was wrong about the Edwardian novel, and today in the world of academic Eng.Lit is almost completely disregarded. Which author do you think wrote which novel? Continue reading

Event: Rural Modernity at MSA16

Ebenezer Howard's plan for the Garden City

Ebenezer Howard’s plan for the Garden City

Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following seminar, which will form part of the forthcoming Modernist Studies Association conference in Pittsburgh (for more information on the conference see here).

Rural Modernity (MSA Seminar, open to 15 participants all of whom present 5-7 page position papers in advance and discuss this work at the conference in Pittsburgh, PA, USA, 6-9 November 2014). Kristin Bluemel, Organizer

This seminar invites participants to move beyond analysis of rural representation in modernist works to a theoretical formulation of rural modernity as an interpretive category. What is to be gained for twentieth-century arts and culture studies by shifting our attention from the modernization of the city to modernization of the country, by theorizing rural modernity in relation to existing theories of modernism, middlebrow, and modernity?
Invited participant: Ysanne Holt, Art History, Northumbria University.

CFP: Modernist Criticisms

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Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following CFP:

Modernist Criticisms: Graduate Conference, Saturday 7 June 2014

Centre for Modernist Studies, University of Sussex

Keynote Speaker: Professor Tim Armstrong, Royal Holloway

Our conceptions of modernism are not just informed by its literature. As is widely recognized, essays including Woolf’s ‘Modern Fiction’ and Eliot’s ‘Tradition and the Individual Talent’ provide these writers – and their readers -alternative methods of approaching literary questions and a wider arena within which to expound and explore their theories. But while the critical texts of these canonical figures are well known and studied, work by various minor figures of the period, and this work’s engagement with their artistic concerns, is still frequently overlooked. Many kinds of writing remain marginalized within studies of modernist literature, including work for commercial publications and political movements, for educational instruction, and writing beyond the literary scenes of London and Paris. Research into early twentieth-century literary culture has stimulated important discussions surrounding the production and reception of modernist criticism, including the impact of publishing practices and the professionalization of intellectual pursuits. But this research prompts a need for further enquiry into how critical and creative writing in this period are mutually engaged with these cultural contexts in view. Continue reading

CFP: Modernism Now!

‘Figure Composition’ by David Bomberg, c.1913

The British Association for Modernist Studies, International Conference 2014

MODERNISM NOW!

26–28 June 2014

Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London

Keynote Speakers: Tyrus Miller (University of California, Santa Cruz), Jacqueline Rose (Queen Mary, London)

Modernism Now! is a three-day international, interdisciplinary conference organised by the British Association for Modernist Studies, designed to explore modernisms throughout the late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The conference aims to discuss the past achievements of modernism, its possible futures, and to provide a review of current activity in the field. In Modernism and Theory, Neil Levi has recently suggested that in thinking about modernism we consider ‘the idea of a contemporary perpetuation of artistic modernism’ and that we see ‘modernist works as events whose implications demand continued investigation.’ Continue reading

CFP: Maverick Voices and Modernity

‘We Speak a Different Tongue’: Maverick Voices and Modernity

International Conference, St. John’s College, Durham University, UK, 5-6 July 2013

Plenary speakers: Professor Chris Baldick (Goldsmiths College, University of London) and Professor Michael O’Neill (Durham University)

With a focus on the fiction, poetry, and drama of the period 1890-1939, “Maverick Voices” registers the diversity of innovation beyond the traditionally defined boundaries of literary Modernism. Famously in “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1924), Virginia Woolf distinguishes between two literary camps: the Edwardians and the Georgians. By praising the Georgians and vilifying the Edwardians, Woolf privileges an aesthetic of what later became identified as Modernism against a continuing tradition of realism. This is indicative of both continuities and discontinuities – between Modernism and, in Yeats’s phrase, those different tongues of nineteenth-century sensibilities – which have prevailed as a persistent presence in much recent literary criticism.

“Maverick Voices” contributes to current debates about where the boundaries of literary Modernism should be drawn. Continue reading

Call for Papers: ‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence

If you’re seeking four days of conference madness next April, you may be interested in the following event, which takes place in the two days preceding our own inaugural conference (the first day of which will also be held in Durham):

‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence

Durham University, 9-11 April 2013

‘[T]he poets of the nineties were entirely missed out of my personal history […] I never read any of these people until it was much too late for me to get anything out of them’. T.S. Eliot, letter to Ezra Pound, 1924

‘[I]t was towards the end of my school days or in my first year or two at Harvard University [that] I was reading the poets of the ‘nineties, who were the only poets […] who at that period of history seemed to have anything to offer me as a beginner’.T.S. Eliot, Saltire Review, iv, 1957

If Ezra Pound’s clamorous injunction – ‘make it new!’ – might be considered the first commandment of modernism, then Brecht’s dictum – ‘efface the traces!’ – stands as its complementary shadow statement. As the example of Eliot begins to illustrate, the Poundian urge to transfigure ‘legitimate’ influences results in a comparable urge to efface influences considered inappropriate. However, criticism has often proved inadequately alert to the motives underlying authorial advertisement and evasion of influence, instead colluding with the artist in the construction of a suspiciously orderly canonical narrative of modernist influence. We dutifully discuss Eliot as the heir of Dante and Donne; we corroborate Woolf’s departure from Wells and Bennett; we identify the Ibsen in Exiles, and the Confucianism of the Cantos. Continue reading