Tag Archives: neo-edwardian

Exhibition: Scratching the Veneer, Bristol

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‘Edwardian Britain has often been described as a golden sunlit afternoon… in fact, modern Britain was born during the reign of Edward VII, when politics, science, literature and the arts were turned upside down’ (Roy Hattersley, 2004)

Scratching The Veneer is a site-specific group exhibition located in the unique venue of the Grade I listed Edwardian Ladies cloakroom. This eclectic exhibition integrates political, social, cultural and historical narratives to expose the darker elements of Edwardian society and evoke connections with society today. The featured artists form a dialogue with the space using themes identified by the curator such as Edwardian class distinction, social hierarchy, sexual relations, sanitation and toxic beauty.

The exhibition runs from 17 November 2016, at The Edwardian Cloakroom – Ladies Side, Clifton, Bristol.

Exhibitors: Poppy Clover, Fiona Costelloe, Rose Chittenden, Heather Griffin, Sam Morgan, Ellie Shipley, Phil Toy, Toby Rainbird-Webb

Curated by Fiona Costelloe.

See here for more information.

 

Adapting Conrad: Registration Open!

 Adapting Conrad Poster

Adapting Conrad: A multi-disciplinary conference on what happens to books when translated into other media

30 May 2014, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, University of London

“Thereʼs been a lot of talk about the way in which Hollywood directors distort literary masterpieces. Iʼll have no part of that!”
– Alfred Hitchcock to Francois Truffaut, 1968.

Joseph Conradʼs fictions have been adapted for stage, screen, and radio, and have appeared in songs, graphic novels, and art installations. His work has been adapted by Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, Francis Ford Coppola, Bob Dylan, Christopher Hampton, Nicolas Roeg … and Conrad himself, who wrote three stage plays and a film treatment based on his own stories.

What happens to a literary work – masterpiece or otherwise – when it is adapted into another media? Is it always a distortion? What criteria of success can be used to judge an adaptation? What can we learn about narrative, audiences, and genre from the process of adaptation and the relationship between the original and the adaptation? How can different critical approaches help us understand that relationship?

These are some of the questions we will be addressing in ʻAdapting Conradʼ, a one-day conference hosted by the Institute of English Studies at Senate House, London, on 30 May 2014. Continue reading