Tag Archives: periodisation

The Lloyd-Georgian period?

David Lloyd-George

David Lloyd-George

‘Today essentially belongs to the Minister who once presided at the Board of Trade. Several attempts indeed have been made to describe the literature, art and drama of the present as “Edwardian,” from a very proper and loyal spirit, to which I should be the last to object […] But somehow the whole thing has fallen through; in this dramatic aeon the adjective “Edwardian” trips on the tongue; our real dramatists are all Socialists or Radicals; our poets and writers Anarchists (Mr. Arthur Machen being an honourable exception); and our artists are the only conservatives of intellect. Our foreign policy alone can be called “Edwardian,” so personal is it to the King. Everything else is a compromise; so our time must therefore be known – at least ten years of it – as the Lloyd-Georgian period.’ (Robert Ross, Masques and Phases, London 1909)

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CFP: Recoveries 2014: Reconnections – 1714-1914.

Edwardian scholars may be interested in the following CFP:

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Reconnecting with three centuries of literature and history.
A one day conference at the School of English, University of Nottingham.
23 June 2014.

2014 marks the centenary of the Great War, the bicentenary of Napoleon’s exile to Elba, and the tricentenary of George I’s accession to the throne.

Building on the success of the 2011 conference, Recoveries – Revisiting the Long Nineteenth Century, the University of Nottingham is pleased to announce a second conference in association with Centre for Regional Literature and Culture: Reconnections. This one-day interdisciplinary conference seeks to re-evaluate the scholarly practice/s of recovery projects and to consider how they impact on our understanding of literary, political and cultural developments, changes, fads and fashions over the last three centuries.

We invite proposals from postgraduates and early career researchers in literature, history, politics and any other branch of the humanities. Papers can deal with any period/s, author/s or text/s produced between 1714 and 1914. They could focus on, but are not limited to, the following: Continue reading

CFP: Periodisation: Pleasures and Pitfalls

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CFP: ‘Periodisation: Pleasures and Pitfalls’

All Souls College, Oxford (June 3 2014)
Keynote: Professor James Simpson (Harvard)
Abstract deadline: March 1 2014

What do we mean by ‘medieval’?  When does ‘late eighteenth-century’ become ‘Romantic’?  What on earth is ‘Early Modern’?  How did these categories come about in the first place?  Papers are invited for a one-day conference on the advantages and problems of periodisation, which aims to interrogate the literary-historical categories that govern the way we organise, teach and think about literature.

We ask whether periodisation is a useful tool for segmenting the lengthy sweep of English literature into sensible sections for study, or whether it is a naïve, narrowly historicist critical approach that risks making unhelpful connections between radically different types of texts.  Continue reading